Ranger

The role of a ranger is dependent on the environment you are responsible for, different habitats require different approaches of management and face different pressures. Beautiful natural places attract lots of people for recreation and it is the Ranger’s responsibility to aid public access and enjoyment of these areas whilst protecting them for nature. This includes practical tasks such as footpath maintenance, fitting or repairing outdoor furniture or habitat creation.   However, it may also involve public engagement such as guided walks and talks.

A genuine interest in natural history is needed as the public will look to you as an expert in the local environment.   You may be required to speak confidently and accurately about prevalent species and your management techniques. There is a high degree of problem solving as no two tasks are the same, and there is always some complication or challenge that keeps the job interesting.  Tasks are often completed with the aid of volunteers, so you will need the confidence to lead a small enthusiastic team. 

Pathways into this job

Volunteering opportunities to give you work experience:

More details about the role from UCAS:

How To Become A Countryside ranger | Explore Jobs | UCAS

Possible course examples:

Broads Authority runs apprenticeships with Suffolk New College Apprenticeships (broads-authority.gov.uk)

Easton College, Norwich: Diploma in Land & Wildlife Management (Level 3) https://www.easton.ac.uk/courses/subject-areas/countryside-management 

Sparsholt College, Hampshire: Land and Wildlife Management (Countryside and Conservation) – Level 3. Land and Wildlife – L3 – Sparsholt College

West Suffolk College: Land & Wildlife Management Advanced Technical Extended Diploma (Level 3) Land and Wildlife Management Advanced Technical Extended Diploma Level 3 (wsc.ac.uk) 

Information about the employer

Chichester Harbour Conservancy (CHC)

CHC is unique in its purpose as it occupies two, normally separate, roles. Firstly, as the statutory harbour authority for the busiest recreational sailing harbour in Europe and secondly as custodian of the protected landscape known as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

To carry out our conservation work the organisation receives funding from the county council but much of the work is made possible by charitable donations from a partner charity known as the Chichester Harbour Trust or through grants from other conservation organisations or government schemes.

As a small team on the AONB side of CHC, we are made up of an AONB Manager, an Ecologist, two Rangers, a Community Ranger, two Planners and an Education Department (who mostly run field trips for schools).  However, we certainly would not be able to function as effectively without the volunteers who help with various conservation tasks, events, or education.

The Conservancy offer work experience. Please see the link below for more details:

https://www.conservancy.co.uk/page/job-vacancies